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    Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard, photographed by Reportage’s Benjamin Lowy in July for the New York Times Magazine. This and other images appears in a profile of Bouchard in this week’s issue. Read, “Eugenie Bouchard Could Be Tennis’s Next Big Shot,” at NYTimes.com.

    (Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Reportage by Getty Images for New York Times Magazine.)

    'In March 2009, the International Criminal Court in the Hague issued an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir for seven counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Darfur conflict, the first warrant issued by the ICC against a sitting head of state. At that time, only a handful of journalists were given permission to report from Darfur, and with most aid agencies gone, we were the eyes for the world on the state of the displaced and the camps.’

    -Lynsey Addario, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2008 for her work in Darfur. 

    2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    Jonathan Torgovnik was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2007 for his project “Intended Consequences.” Torgovnik followed 50 women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, and who bore children as a result. The project was built through a series of narratives constructed from environmental portraits, audio interviews and textual reflections. “Intended Consequences” led to the creation of Foundation Rwanda, which provides assistance to the mothers and children.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    'Although antiretroviral drugs were available in the States and throughout Europe they were nonexistent in Africa at that time. The cost of medicine and the surrounding treatment were price prohibitive in countries where the majority of people live off $2 a day.

    While documenting this crisis I chose to focus on the stories of individuals. The scope of the pandemic was too widespread. My images exist as a record of people I met who lost their lives to AIDS, as a reminder that countless others seek access to life saving drugs and that children orphaned by the disease need our help.’

    -Kristen Ashburn, winner of the Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography 2006 for her project Bloodline.

    2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images

    Study Estimates 100,000 Elephants Killed in Last 3 Years

    The continued demand for ivory from China and elsewhere in Asia has led to a dramatic decline in Africa’s elephant populations in the last decade, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Extrapolating from local population estimates, the authors estimated that 100,000 elephants have been killed in the last three years and that, in central Africa, the regional population has declined by 64 percent in the last decade. Read more about this study on National Geographic’s website.

    Reportage photographer Brent Stirton documented the illicit ivory trade, and efforts to combat poachers, in 2011 and 2012. In his resulting story, “God’s Ivory,” Brent vividly illustrated the connection between poaching in Africa and demand for religious and cultural icons made from ivory in Asia.

    Captions:

    Top: The largest mass killing of elephants in recent history took place at Bouba Ndjida National Park in North Cameroon close to the Chad and Central African Republic Borders from January through March 2012.

    Middle: The preparation for the burning of 5 tons of trafficked Ivory recovered from a seizure in Singapore in 2002, Manyani, Tsavo, Kenya, July 20, 2011.

    Bottom: Ivory on sale at government registered White Peacock Arts World, Beijing, China, November 15, 2011.

    gettyimages:

    Reportage photographer Benjamin Lowy is offering prints of his Instagram photos and other work in his online store.

    benlowy:

    SUMMER PRINT SALE!

    Get em while they’re hot!

    Go to lowyimages.com/store for print editions and various sizes.

    For specific image requests email ben@benlowy.com or lowylacarphoto@gmail.com 

    Urmialake, Azarbaijan, Iran - Iranian women walk past the salty remains of what used to be the biggest lake in Iran. Instagramer @nima_deimary submitted this photo to our weekly #ReportageSpotlight contest. See all of this week’s selections here.

    gettyimagesarchive:

    Award-winning photographer Tom Stoddart discusses his work with Matthew Butson, Head of the Getty Images Archive

    Tom Stoddart began his photographic career on a local newspaper in his native North East of England. In 1978 he moved to London and began working freelance for publications such as the Sunday Times and Time Magazine. During a long and varied career he has witnessed such international events as the war in Lebanon, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the election of President Nelson Mandela, the bloody siege of Sarajevo and the wars against Saddam Hussein in Iraq.

    The photographs that have emerged during several days of unrest in Ferguson after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer have drawn mournful comparisons to pictures of the Deep South in the 1960s or of more recent racial unrest, like the 1992 Los Angeles riots. But they have also prompted a flood of commentary about the differences half a century has made in the visual economy…. Today, the imagery one sees depends on the filters one uses. One person’s Twitter feed may be full of footage of police firing tear gas or of peaceful protesters with their hands up. But David J. Garrow, a historian at the University of Pittsburgh’s law school and the author of several books on the civil rights movement, noted that when he searched for images of Ferguson on Google, roughly half showed what appeared to be looting. Such images look “more like Watts in 1965 or Newark in 1967, not Birmingham in 1963 or Selma in 1965,” Dr. Garrow said. And historically, he said, such photos were “deadly when it came to white public opinion.”

    Randy Kennedy and Jennifer Schuessler in The New York Times: Ferguson Images Evoke Civil Rights Era and Changing Visual Perceptions

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