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    reportagebygettyimages:

    ‘You get mixed emotions, that they would travel so far to look for work. Hundreds of miles through perils. The fence doesn’t really stop them. As long as they think there’s employment in the United States, they will continue to do that, just like anyone trying to better themselves for a better job.’

    The United States’ border with Mexico is nearly 2000 miles long and is blocked by numerous natural and man-made barriers. Reportage Featured Contributor Charles Ommanney journeyed along the border and met the residents, border patrol agents, and immigrants who pass back and forth across it. See his film: The Fence, Part 1 on MSNBC Photos.

    Image: After walking for days a Honduran man appears overwhelmed after being caught in a drainage ditch by Border Patrol. McAllen, TX. Photo by Charles Ommanney

    Update: Part 2 of The Fence is now live.

    Photo by Robert Nickelsberg Photo by Benjamin Lowy Photo by Sarah Elliott Photo by Katie Orlinsky

    July 4th Around the U.S.

    Americans celebrated Independence Day last Friday and Reportage photographers around the country captured the festivities in their infinite variety, from a dip in a pond in Alaska to a morning parade in New Jersey. Even non-Americans got in on the action: our contributor David Degner sent an image from a “US-themed” party in Cairo, Egypt, where people wore American flag t-shirts and played beer pong. See our photographers’ visual dispatches on our @gettyreportage Instagram account.

    A belated #ReportageSpotlight from last week. Thanks to everyone who participated, especially those we included above (from left to right):@patrickryanzero@matik82@bookhopper,@benna76@kym__bee@khalilabyat,@stefani_stan@nima_deimari and @firdauslatif. Every week we post our favorite pictures from Reportage’s Instagram followers. To participate, tag your best photos with #ReportageSpotlight. Using this hashtag entitles us only to repost your images on this account and the Reportage blog. Full terms & conditions here: bit.ly/1fATOK9. Despite our tardy post we’ll post another roundup this Friday.

    Reportage by Getty Images today announced it has signed for exclusive representation, the MacArthur Foundation Genius recipient, American photojournalist Lynsey Addario. A leader in her field, Addario has covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, and Congo, and shot features across the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa highlighting the human crisis of war to the world.

    Aidan Sullivan, Vice President, Photo Assignments, Getty Images added, “Lynsey is one of the most respected and accomplished photojournalists of her generation. She possesses all of the rare skills and qualities that this unique and elite group require to make them stand out above the rest. Her extraordinary thirst for knowledge, her ability to create compelling and visually stunning narratives, her passion, persistence and resilience are all part of what makes her the formidable journalist she is. I am immensely proud that Lynsey has chosen to work with us, her decision is further evidence of the commitment we at Getty Images have made towards supporting and representing photojournalism.”

    For more information and the official press release click here.

    guardian:

    Jim Goldberg, the photographer who caught the heartbreak on both sides of America’s social divide. See more here

    All photos by Jim Goldberg

    reportagebygettyimages:

    'I was living with the Boss Man. I don’t love that man, but because of the war, I could not deny him. He would kill me. I would die. So I would not refuse.

    I gave birth in the bush to a daughter named Mamiaye. And when the war ended, we came out to the town. He left me here. He never came again. Nobody said I want to take care of this woman with this child. You are a woman of a rebel. You killed people during the war. And now you come for forgiveness? Not here.’ - Janet, who was abducted by rebels at age 20 and forced to fight in Sierra Leone’s 11 year civil war.

    At this week’s Global Summit to end Sexual Violence in Conflict, UN special envoy Angelina Jolie opened the event by saying that one of the goals was to end the disgrace that comes with being a victim.

    Girl Soldier, a film by Reportage photographer Jonathan Torgovnik, which chronicles the stories of Sierra Leone’s female child soldiers, is being screened at the summit. Watch the film here.

    UPDATE: Read interviews with Jonathan about the project on National Geographic Proof and Canon Professional Network.

    In Nepal, families prefer sons over daughters, and girls from low castes seldom go to school. Even well-off families send their boys to good private schools while girls must attend over-crowded public school. This devaluation of women in Nepalese society, along with poverty and a lack of job opportunities, has created a growing trade in sex trafficking. A study by the University of Oxford’s Refugee Studies Center estimates that as many as 7,000 women and girls are trafficked out of Nepal every year.

    See more photos from Bought & Sold, by Katie Orlinsky

     

    curphoto:

    New York, NY—On July 15, Matt Eich’s photo exhibit, The Invisible Yoke, opens @TheHalfKing. Examining microcosms of the American experience, this project comprises four chapters: Ohio, Mississippi, Virginia, and a road-trip odyssey around America. As such, it is a mining of American regional society. The images refer to legacies of the nation’s past, but keep the individual front and center. And Matt is always alert to fantastical elements that lend poetry to mundane realities.

    http://ift.tt/1pnzzUg @matteich #hkphotoseries #squaready http://ift.tt/1onQJhb

    ‘You get mixed emotions, that they would travel so far to look for work. Hundreds of miles through perils. The fence doesn’t really stop them. As long as they think there’s employment in the United States, they will continue to do that, just like anyone trying to better themselves for a better job.’

    The United States’ border with Mexico is nearly 2000 miles long and is blocked by numerous natural and man-made barriers. Reportage Featured Contributor Charles Ommanney journeyed along the border and met the residents, border patrol agents, and immigrants who pass back and forth across it. See his film: The Fence, Part 1 on MSNBC Photos.

    Image: After walking for days a Honduran man appears overwhelmed after being caught in a drainage ditch by Border Patrol. McAllen, TX. Photo by Charles Ommanney

    Dr. Jorge Chiu is a cardiothoracic surgeon who moonlights with Guatemala City’s Bomberos Voluntarios, a volunteer fire-fighting and ambulance service that has operated in South and Latin America since the mid-1950s. For the latest episode of Profiles by Vice, Reportage contributor Giles Clarke rode along with Dr. Chiu as he responded to fires, car accidents and murder scenes in the one of the most violent cities in the world.

    Giles Clarke has also established a fundraising campaign to help Dr. Chiu purchase a newer secondhand truck and medical supplies he uses in his volunteer work. Visit the Go Fund Me page to learn more.

    Giles’s still images of Dr. Chiu and the Bomberos are viewable on GettyImages.com.

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