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    timelightbox:

    Photo: Kevin Frayer—Getty Images

    Photojournalism Links: August 2014 (Part 1)

    Curated by Mikko Takkunen, a collection of the most interesting photojournalism and documentary photography from across the web.

    Thanks to everyone who participated in this week’s #ReportageSpotlight, especially the Instagrammers who took this week’s selected photos (from top left): @mansoreh.motamedi@meganjaepearl@fatemeh_erfanian@wh1ppasnappa@lisabnyc@ravimishraindia@ahmadmousa@rshrsho and @hosseinheidarpour. Every week we post our favorite pictures from Reportage’s Instagram followers. To participate, tag your best photos with #ReportageSpotlight. Using this hashtag entitles us only to repost your images on this account and the Reportage blog. Full terms & conditions here: bit.ly/1fATOK9.

    Horse goes bowling. Instagram photo by Reportage photographer @edouphoto in Torshavn, Faroe Islands.

    "What are the advantages of using an iPhone?"

    Photojournalist Benjamin Lowy talks to Richard Aedy, of the Australian Broadcasting Company Radio Network, about the virtues of using a mobile phone in the field. In the above video, Lowy, who has made mobile-phone images while working in Libya, Afghanistan, and his own backyard of New York City, explains how he chooses the right tool for the job. As for the question above, Lowy says:

    When you shoot with an SLR or rangefinder or any type of camera, you’re taking this huge black box and throwing it in front of your face. And you’re blocking out your ability to interact with your subject. Sometimes that can be good if you need if you need to cut your empathy off, so like if you’re at a funeral and you need to pull yourself emotionally out of a situation. But a lot of times I’m just talking to someone out on the street, and all of the sudden I am cutting the level of empathy and the level of interaction and intimacy with people by putting a camera against your face. So by using the phone I can keep eye contact with the people I’m photographing.

    Hear more segments from ABC RN’s ‘Media Report’ on the show’s website.

    What is it like covering war in your own backyard? The New York Times interviewed the Israeli photojournalist Uriel Sinai about his experience photographing his country’s side of the recent conflict, as seen here in this Aug. 2 image of an Israeli tank firing artillery toward the Gaza strip.

    Q. Because of your work in both Israel and the West Bank you probably have closer contact with a wider range of Palestinians and Israeli Arabs than most Israelis. Do you get to see both sides in a way many Israelis don’t?

    A. I have many Palestinian photographer friends and we work shoulder to shoulder. You do understand the suffering better than most Israelis and you understand what’s happening on the other side. This whole situation is terrible. Covering this conflict is something that feels like it’s never going to end. You see the suffering on both sides and at a certain point you feel you have had enough.

    The Times also spoke with Palestinian photographer Wissam Nassar, who was born and raised in Gaza. Read more of their interviews on Lens. The blog has also recently featured interviews with photographers Tyler Hicks and Sergey Ponomarev and their experiences shooting in the Gaza Strip.

    everydayafrica:

    Kamberg, South Africa | July 30, 2014: Farm laborers from multiple farms work on extinguish a fire that was suspected to have started by a boy playing with matches. Photo by Charlie Shoemaker @charlieshoemaker #Kamberg #southafrica

    baptisttown:

    Busted windshield, Baptist Town neighborhood of Greenwood, Mississippi on June 9, 2014. From the series, “Sin & Salvation in Baptist Town.”

    Made using Kodak Professional Films, with support in part from the Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography.

    Photographer Matt Eich has created a Tumblr page for his ongoing project about contemporary race and class disparities in Greenwood, Mississippi.

    (via baptisttown)

    Instagram photo by Reportage’s @edouphoto | A barn and a happy dog. #nólsoy #faroeislands #woof #woofwoof

    Thanks to everyone who participated in this week’s #ReportageSpotlight, especially the Instagrammers who took this week’s selected photos (from top left): @asav78@d3v90901@narjes_naderinejad@gianlucacolla@arminpix@firdauslatif@el_fotomat@hanifshoaei and @jeffmcintoshpix. Every week we post our favorite pictures from Reportage’s Instagram followers. To participate, tag your best photos with #ReportageSpotlight. Using this hashtag entitles us only to repost your images on this account and the Reportage blog. Full terms & conditions here: bit.ly/1fATOK9.

    gettyimagesarchive:

    Faces Of World War I By Steve Pyke

     “ The war had always gripped me. As a child I met and spoke openly to the old timers who had fought, including  my grandfather Arthur Pyke who served as a cabin boy at the battle of Jutland in 1916. I realized that by chance of birth had I been born in the late 19th century, then undoubtedly I would have served too. By the time I completed this project to photograph the veterans of WWI – in their homes and in multiple countries,  most of those who had fought had passed away. As the centenary of the War approaches it’s a poignant time to revisit these faces of WWI.”

    Caption:Vahan Dukmejian, a veteran of World War I, on Long Island, USA, 1993. (Photo by Steve Pyke/Getty Images)

    Caption:Nicholas Keating, a British veteran of World War I, at the Royal Hospital Chelsea in London, UK, 17th May 1994. Residents of the hospital are known colloquially as Chelsea pensioners. (Photo by Steve Pyke/Getty Images)

    Caption:Rene Vincent, a veteran of World War I, 12th June 1993. He fought at the Battle of Verdun in 1916. (Photo by Steve Pyke/Getty Images)

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