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    'I was with my colleague friend Manon Querouil doing a story on oil companies who are destroying the Niger Delta and rebels who are attacking pipe-lines and kidnapping people. The rebels, known as the Movement of Emancipation of the Niger Delta, and Ateke, their chief, were living hidden in the mangrove….After a few days Ateke fancies Manon and wants to sleep with her. I had to play the big sister role, saying that she can not, she would have to be married. Warlord says fine, he will marry Manon – what’s another wife or two. We said to him that we needed beautiful dresses, a ring and to all our parents. Ateke gave us some money and send a man with us so we can buy our girl things. Of course as soon as we arrived into the city we flew back to France. Ateke is probably still waiting for his evaporated wife.'

    -Reportage by Getty Images photographer Veronique de Viguerie recalls the story behind one her most iconic photos -  Escaping a Marriage Proposal from a Warlord

    For the guys who signed up for ISIS—including, especially, the masked man with the English accent who wielded the knife—killing is the real point of being there.

    Dexter Filkins on the murder of Steven Sotloff. (via newyorker)

    (via newyorker)

    Photo by Mary F. Calvert/Courtesy of the Alexia Foundation Photo by Mary F. Calvert/Courtesy of the Alexia Foundation Photo by Mary F. Calvert/Courtesy of the Alexia Foundation

    Photographer’s Project Focuses on Homeless Female Veterans

    Female veterans are four times more likely to become homeless than civilian women, according to photographer Mary F. Calvert, who has received the 2014 Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant for her project “Missing in Action: Homeless Female Veterans.” Her work supported by this grant will focus on the Los Angeles region, which has the largest concentration of homeless veterans. She will examine the slow response to this crisis by the beleaguered U.S. Dept. of Veterans’ Affairs as well as the organizations that attempt to help these women.

    Ms. Calvert notes that women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan arrive home with health care issues like PTSD, as well as custody battles resulting from the strain of deployment on their families. For many women, the military was a way to escape a difficult situation, yet harassment, sexual assault and the lack of advancement opportunities have driven them out of it.

    Read more on the Alexia Foundation’s website.

    Portraits of the victims of the siege on School No 1. The gym is now a makeshift memorial. (Photo by Diana Markosian) Alex Badoyev, 17 stands in the room where his father was shot and killed. Badoyev and his parents were among the hostages taken that day. (Photo by Diana Markosian) Aslan Shavlakhov. 1998-2004. A blood stained undershirt found after the attack. (Photo by Diana Markosian)

    Beslan School Siege, 10 Years Later

    On Sept. 1, 2004, 1,200 students were taken hostage during a back-to-school event in Beslan, North Ossetia, a Russian republic. Two days later, about 330 hostages were dead, more than half of them children. Reportage photographer Diana Markosian visited Beslan in advance of the anniversary and her resulting photographs - of survivors, the school and the graves of the dead - were published in Time Lightbox over the weekend, accompanied by an essay by Katya Cengel.

    "Beslan is considered one of the conflict’s greatest travesties against the innocent," writes Cengel. "But a decade later the world has moved on. Residents of this little North Caucasus town have not, partly because important questions remain unanswered: How many terrorists escaped? What caused the explosion that lead to the storming of the school?"

    See the feature on Time Lightbox.

    (Photos by Diana Markosian)

    A photo from Oman by Instagram user @oleelfephoto, chosen for our #ReportageSpotlight roundup.

    Thanks to everyone who participated in #ReportageSpotlight this week, especially the following Instagrammers whose images we selected. From left to right: @ravimishraindia, @benjaminrutherford, @jeffrey_bright, @manuthomas (via @everydaymumbai), @oleelfephoto, @runnings87, @ndymoto, @alliakarumbi and @peroledahlsrud. Each week we highlight our favorite pictures from our Instagram followers. You can participate by adding the hashtag #ReportageSpotlight to your best photos every week. Full terms & conditions of #ReportageSpotlight can be found here: bit.ly/1fATOK9.

    'Racism has long been part of American history. Undeniably powerful and disturbing images of swastikas, Klansmen and flaming crosses are immensely associated with the term. Since the civil-rights movement of the ’50s and ’60s, many people prefer to believe racism no longer exists. Yet, it is still alive and functioning in this country. Today, with the goal of becoming part of the American mainstream, the racist movement operates through both subtle and transparent practices to recruit new believers from among America's youth.'

    -David S. Holloway, who won a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2005 for his project documenting white nationalism in the US.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    This project is more correctly a response to changes in the American social landscape: the return of thousands of soldiers from Afghanistan, the rise in suicides among military personnel, in the numbers of homeless vets, jobless vets, veterans being sent to prison. I have no choice but to do this, what with one violent attack on a population invariably leading to others, one killing leading to myriad killings, one isolated war evolving into global war, with apathy and silence leading the way.’

    In 2008, renowned photographer Eugene Richards received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for ‘War is Personal,’ his project examining the effects of the Iraq War on veterans and their families. After publishing a book of the work, he again applied for the grant in 2013, and received it. See Richards speak about the grant and War is Personal in this video.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    The drag-queen wrestler Saúl Armendáriz, who goes by the name Cassandro, at a Lucha VaVoom show, in Los Angeles, Calif. “You know who I fight in the ring? Cassandro. The guy who needs to be famous. Your ego is not your amigo. It’s Saúl against Cassandro up there.”

    Reportage contributor Katie Orlinsky recently spent time photographing Cassandro for this week’s New Yorker, accompanying a profile by William Finnegan. You can see more of Cassandro in and outside the ring in a short documentary, “Cassandro’s Big Fight,” shot by Katie and produced by the New Yorker and Reel Peak films.

    (Photo by Katie Orlinsky for the New Yorker)

    'The city is not markedly divided into ‘French’ or ‘Arab’ neighborhoods. It is more of a ‘rich-poor’ divide. But the high concentration of Arab families in the poorer northern quartiers [quarters] of Marseille is clearly evident. The schools are perfect examples that depict this ‘north-south’ or ‘Arab-French’ divide. Children of Muslim families are concentrated in schools in the Northern working-class quartiers of Marseille.'

    -Bharat Choudhary, who won a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2012 to examine the roots of ‘Islamophobia’ in Marseille, France.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

     

    'My quest following the e-waste trail began by accident while standing over the cliffs looking at the icebergs in Uummannaq, Greenland, in November 2010. I could see the results of our modern day throw-away society, discarded junk: computers, dish washers, washing machines, televisions, stereos, office supplies, toilets, trucks, cars…The amount of e-waste we generate is unfathomable, and has resulted in ecological devastation, destroying millions of families, who must harvest whatever is salvageable at great risk to their lives.'

    -Photographer Stanley Greene, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2011 for his project following the trail of electronic trash that is creating by modern technology.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

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