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    Marco Di Lauro/Reportage by Getty Images for ICRC Marco Di Lauro/Reportage by Getty Images for ICRC Marco Di Lauro/Reportage by Getty Images for ICRC

    'They move one meter by one meter, on their knees. They do this for 10 hours a day, every day, with incredible dedication and effort.' - Marco Di Lauro, Photographer, on clearing landmines in Iraq.

    In Iraq, as violence continues to flare, the legacy of old conflicts still remains in the form of buried landmines. The work of clearing the mines is painstaking and dangerous, but is of great importance in the protection of local civilians. Landmines stay active and continue to maim and kill long after wars have ended.

    See Di Lauro discuss his work documenting landmines in Iraq for ICRC.

    During periods of armed violence, providing health care can become an extraordinarily hazardous undertaking beset by difficulties and threats to safety. Medical teams find themselves operating without basic equipment, and sometimes without even electricity or water. To evacuate or to reach the wounded and the sick in conflict zones, health-care workers sometimes have to put themselves at great risk.

    Health Care in Danger: An Issue for Our Time, a new photo exhibition by the International Committee of the Red Cross, shows that ‘violence against health care is not a recent phenomenon and has never been confined to one place or one period.’

    Image: While evacuating by Chinook helicopter, Fiona McGlynn, Commanding Officer of the Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT), performs cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on a Danish soldier who was severely injured by an IED in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Reportage by Getty Images)

    'I could see gas masks all around and [the fighters] were all talking about this. Everyone was already having problems with their eyes. One day I did an interview with the commander of the little position. These guys are used to shelling, fighting, snipers. That’s their life. But chemicals, you never know. It has a real psychological effect. You cannot smell it or see it for certain. Sometimes there is not even smoke.

    At first I was scared with what I saw and what I was carrying, because we knew it was something that could change everything….My colleague and I had a long argument. Should we release everything when we were stuck in Damascus? Do we run the story and send it to the newspapers right away? But then we would be a bigger target, so we decided to not do it.’

    -Laurent Van der Stockt on realizing that Assad’s forces in Syria were using chemical weapons. Read more - The Photographer Who Crossed Obama’s ‘Red Line’

    Image by Laurent Van der Stockt/Reportage by Getty Images, from Nerve Gas in Syria

    Ten Years in Iraq - FALLUJAH - OCTOBER 2004: A U.S. Marine from the 1st Expeditionary Force sings a song and plays the guitar during a Protestant religious service at the chapel on their base October 31, 2004 near Fallujah, Iraq. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Reportage by Getty Images)

    Ten Years in Iraq - SAN ANTONIO - AUGUST 2006: PFC Josh Stein, 22, at home with his new-born daughter Jasmine on August 23, 2006 in San Antonio, Texas. Stein lost his legs to an EFP explosion in Iraq on Easter Sunday 2006, and is now a double-amputee rehabilitation patient at Brook Army Medical Center. The explosion that took his legs ripped through the Bradley armored vehicle he was driving. Stein had the presence of mind to drive the vehicle out of the attack zone and park it before passing out. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images)

    Ten Years in Iraq - SADR CITY, BAGHDAD - MARCH 2008: Pieces of scrap metal and boxes mark graves in a makeshift cemetery for victims of sectarian killing, on the eastern outskirts the poor Shia slums of Sadr City. The bodies, shot by Shia militiamen, are collected from a nearby killing ground called al-Sadda, and buried by locals. (Photo by Ghaith Abdul-Ahad/ Reportage by Getty Images). See more iconic images from the Iraq War here.

    Ten Years in Iraq - BAGHDAD - NOVEMBER 2006: Seigtz, a soldier from 28 Combat Service Hospital (CSH), is in charge of transporting bodies from Baghdad CSH to checkpoint number 1 of the International Zone. This photo was taken during his first trip, of which he said: ‘It was the hardest experience of my life, the smell of death was terrible.’ (Photo by Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Reportage by Getty Images). See more iconic images from the Iraq War here.

    Ten Years in Iraq - ISKANDARIYA - 2007: An Iraqi woman holds a sleeping child as US soldiers record her biometrics and interrogate her during a raid on July 15, 2007 in Iskandariya, Iraq. The raid was a search for suspected insurgents and targeted IED production. (Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Reportage by Getty Images)

    BAGHDAD, IRAQ - FEBRUARY 2005:  First Sgt. Troy Hawkins falls wounded to the ground during a firefight in the troubled Haifa Street area February 16, 2005 in Baghdad, Iraq. Sgt. Hawkins was wounded in the leg and shoulder but continued to direct troop movement before walking out of the fire zone. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images)

    IRAQ - 2003: Thick smoke from oil pipeline fires obscures the sun as British Royal marines advance on Basra in southern Iraq during the invasion of 2003. (Photo By Tom Stoddart/Reportage by Getty Images).  See more iconic images from the Iraq War here.

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