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    This project is more correctly a response to changes in the American social landscape: the return of thousands of soldiers from Afghanistan, the rise in suicides among military personnel, in the numbers of homeless vets, jobless vets, veterans being sent to prison. I have no choice but to do this, what with one violent attack on a population invariably leading to others, one killing leading to myriad killings, one isolated war evolving into global war, with apathy and silence leading the way.’

    In 2008, renowned photographer Eugene Richards received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for ‘War is Personal,’ his project examining the effects of the Iraq War on veterans and their families. After publishing a book of the work, he again applied for the grant in 2013, and received it. See Richards speak about the grant and War is Personal in this video.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    'The city is not markedly divided into ‘French’ or ‘Arab’ neighborhoods. It is more of a ‘rich-poor’ divide. But the high concentration of Arab families in the poorer northern quartiers [quarters] of Marseille is clearly evident. The schools are perfect examples that depict this ‘north-south’ or ‘Arab-French’ divide. Children of Muslim families are concentrated in schools in the Northern working-class quartiers of Marseille.'

    -Bharat Choudhary, who won a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2012 to examine the roots of ‘Islamophobia’ in Marseille, France.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

     

    'My quest following the e-waste trail began by accident while standing over the cliffs looking at the icebergs in Uummannaq, Greenland, in November 2010. I could see the results of our modern day throw-away society, discarded junk: computers, dish washers, washing machines, televisions, stereos, office supplies, toilets, trucks, cars…The amount of e-waste we generate is unfathomable, and has resulted in ecological devastation, destroying millions of families, who must harvest whatever is salvageable at great risk to their lives.'

    -Photographer Stanley Greene, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2011 for his project following the trail of electronic trash that is creating by modern technology.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    I came to realize that the majority of the gang members, girls and boys, were often sexually abused in their childhood. Knowing this truth allows us to understand their aggressive behavior and the abuses they commit…To understand does not mean to justify, but having this knowledge can allow us to better fight the root causes.’ 

    -Miquel Dewever-Plana, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2010 for his work documenting Guatemala’s ‘Other War.’

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    'I was able to share pivotal moments with these women, including Kayla, as she turned 21. She was the original Upstate Girl, whose labor and delivery I captured when she was 14. Her now 6 year-old son, De Anthony, was just suspended from kindergarten and diagnosed with ADHD, OCD and separation anxiety.

    I continue to report on this group of young women in Troy, whose lives have become linked by love and blood and law and class, as revelations about the agency of their bonds unfold with each passing birthday.’

    -Brenda Ann Kenneally, who received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2009 for her long-term project ‘Upstate Girls,’ which documents the lives of young women in the post-industrial city of Troy, New York.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    'In March 2009, the International Criminal Court in the Hague issued an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir for seven counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Darfur conflict, the first warrant issued by the ICC against a sitting head of state. At that time, only a handful of journalists were given permission to report from Darfur, and with most aid agencies gone, we were the eyes for the world on the state of the displaced and the camps.’

    -Lynsey Addario, who was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2008 for her work in Darfur. 

    2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    Jonathan Torgovnik was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2007 for his project “Intended Consequences.” Torgovnik followed 50 women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, and who bore children as a result. The project was built through a series of narratives constructed from environmental portraits, audio interviews and textual reflections. “Intended Consequences” led to the creation of Foundation Rwanda, which provides assistance to the mothers and children.

    2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

    'They are connected by the region, the scarred landscape and the lack of opportunity. They are united not by their poverty, but by their connection to family and land. Some people in the region have seen my work and said, “This isn’t where I live, this doesn’t represent us.” I’ve never claimed to represent the entirety of the place; that would be impossible. What I am trying to show is the rather large chunk of society that has been marginalized by shifting industries and families are stuck in a cycle that is difficult to break.' - Matt Eich, photojournalist and Alexia Foundation Grant winner

    Eich, also the winner of a Getty Images Editorial Grant for his project Sin & Salvation in Baptist Town, spent years photographing and getting to know the people of rural Ohio. The region has slowly deteriorated as industry moved out, but, as Eich discovered, strong family ties and regional connections have endured.  Read more on the Alexia Foundation blog.

    Image: Tylor Woodrum, 16, holds a box containing his father’s ashes. Dave Woodrum was killed in August of 2006 in a high-impact 4-wheeler accident. Dave’s family had his body cremated and his favorite cock-fighting rooster mounted on top of the box. Matt Eich/Alexia Foundation

    'If you go to ask somebody about the war, you don’t ask them about the war. You ask them about where they came from, who their parents are. The war becomes part of the texture of their life, and then people will tell you about the war.

    Since its launch in 2004, the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography have celebrated and supported independent photojournalism, as evidenced by the many dynamic and compelling projects completed over the years.

    In this video, two-time Editorial Grant winner Eugene Richardstakes us on an intensely emotional and powerful journey as he shares his experience working on his grant project “War is Personal.”

    The Getty Images Grants are now accepting applications.

    The Alexia Foundation is currently accepting entries for its Women’s Initiative Grant. The call for entries asks photographers to propose a serious documentary photographic or multimedia project encompassing any issue involving women anywhere in the world. Learn more at alexiafoundation.org

    Image by Tim Matsui, 2012 Women’s Initiative winner

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