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    They were very young Taliban, so they all had cell phones. Some of them had Britney Spears ringtones on them. They started taking some selfies with us, so I thought then that I could take some pictures of them. The first half an hour everyone was stressed and looking at each other without doing much; it was very tense. After I took out my camera and started taking a few pictures, and I showed them, it was easier….when I know a picture is important I don’t really think that much about anything else.

    Reportage by Getty Images photographer Veronique de Viguerie recounts her first meeting with the Taliban in 2006. Hear more on BBC World Service.

    MARCH 2009 - Malala Yousafzai, age 12, photographed at home in Peshawar, Pakistan. At the time, Sharia law had just been adopted in the Swat Valley and Malala worried that education for girls after the 4th grade would be banned. Three years later, in October 2012, she was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen, but survived. The militants behind the attack claimed that it was because she promoted secularism.

    Today, the Nobel Committee announced that Malala has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian children’s rights advocate Kailash Satyarthi.

    Photo by Veronique de Viguerie/Reportage by Getty Images. See more.

    'I was with my colleague friend Manon Querouil doing a story on oil companies who are destroying the Niger Delta and rebels who are attacking pipe-lines and kidnapping people. The rebels, known as the Movement of Emancipation of the Niger Delta, and Ateke, their chief, were living hidden in the mangrove….After a few days Ateke fancies Manon and wants to sleep with her. I had to play the big sister role, saying that she can not, she would have to be married. Warlord says fine, he will marry Manon – what’s another wife or two. We said to him that we needed beautiful dresses, a ring and to all our parents. Ateke gave us some money and send a man with us so we can buy our girl things. Of course as soon as we arrived into the city we flew back to France. Ateke is probably still waiting for his evaporated wife.'

    -Reportage by Getty Images photographer Veronique de Viguerie recalls the story behind one her most iconic photos -  Escaping a Marriage Proposal from a Warlord

    "As we come round a bend, we are surprised as we come across 30-40 people lying face down on the ground, with their hands on their heads. It’s already too late, we have walked right into an ambush. Heavily armed men in military uniforms stop our vehicle, and throw us to the ground with the rest. I am wearing the full hijab, or abaya. I am afraid, very afraid. I don’t think they have seen me properly yet. Here, in these Malian lands, I would be worth a lot of money as a hostage… I think of my daughter. What was I thinking coming here?"

    Read more of Veronique De Viguerie's account of photographing the recent conflict in Mali in the latest Reportage Journal.

    Caption: Boni, Mali - January 21: A group of refugees ambushed in the no man’s land between Mali and Burkina Faso. A group of heavily armed hooded men in military uniform forced them from their vehicles, and forced them to the ground. The perpetrators emptied the refugees’ bags and stole everything of value.

    In the summer of 2012 we printed the first Reportage Magazine, which showcased the wonderful and inspiring work of the talented photographers we represent. We have now released the second issue, along with a full multimedia version of “God’s Ivory,” by Brent Stirton.

    Reportage Magazine is accompanied by an online version available on the Reportage website. We are proud to pay tribute to the photographers we work with, to recognise their talent, to put a spotlight on them and to tell the stories about the genesis and creation of their work.

    All too often the dedication and commitment of these extraordinary people is overlooked and the personal hardship and risks they undertake in order to create their stories is dismissed and taken for granted.

    Please join us in celebrating their creativity and passion and congratulating them on their marvelous achievements.

    Best Wishes,
    Aidan Sullivan
    Vice President Getty Images

    Teenage Kayayo girls sleep at a market in Accra, Ghana. The Kayayei (‘market girls’) move from northern Ghana, where sustenance is hard to come by, to Accra in search of work. They often face difficult labor and dangers such as robbery and kidnapping. For many Kayayei, the journey south signals an affirmation of adulthood, and a transition between tradition and modernity.

    From Kayayo Girls of Ghana, by Veronique de Viguerie

    'As we come round a bend, we are surprised as we come across 30-40 people lying face down on the ground, with their hands on their heads. It’s already too late, we have walked right into an ambush. Heavily armed men in military uniforms stop our vehicle, and throw us to the ground with the rest. I am wearing the full hijab, or abaya. I am afraid, very afraid. I don’t think they have seen me properly yet. Here, in these Malian lands, I would be worth a lot of money as a hostage… I think of my daughter. What was I thinking coming here?'

      - Veronique de Viguerie has been covering the conflict in Mali, see more here.

    newyorker:

    The latest segment of HBO’s four-part Witness series follows the French photojournalist Véronique de Viguerie in South Sudan, where thousands have been murdered, kidnapped, or displaced by Joseph Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army.

    Watch a clip from the film (which aired last night on HBO), and click-through for more from Maria Lokke on de Viguerie.

    Can’t. Wait. To watch.

    HBO’s four-part series Witness, premiering November 5, follows photojournalists Michael Christopher Brown, Eros Hoagland, and our own Veronique de Viquerie as they document conflict in Mexico, Brazil, Libya, and South Sudan.

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